Tag Archives: Pakistan

Let’s do tit-for-tat!

As I went through the news of killing of Sarabjit, I felt bad and astounded. Today I woke up to another news of killing of another Prisoner of War, but this time it had happened in India. Was this a way of satiating the feeling of vengeance? Many questions need to be answered. 

At higher levels, the authorities may talk about ‘Aman Ki Asha’ but the never ending game of revenge has always taken over the peace efforts. Till how long we will make the prisoners a pawn and drive the people of respective countries for favorable voting? What kind of diplomacy is this, where one cannot exchange prisoners rather kill them brutally?

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What are you waiting for another day another dawn, somewhere we have to find a new way to peace. What are you waiting for another sign another call, somewhere we have to find a new way to peace!

The worrying fact is that many leaders on both the sides have accepted that such things do not have an end. The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) had said in its report on 2nd May 2013, that “Sarabjit Singh was arrested on August 30, 1990 for bombing and his case is an example of a miscarriage of justice where mistaken identity was presented as the sole evidence of his crime. The victim’s real name was Sarabjit Singh but he was sentenced to death in the name of Manjeet Singh. The sole eye witness of the case told different television channels that he was forced through coercion and intimidation to give evidence against the victim by officials of the intelligence agency, the ISI. Mr. Awais Sheikh, the lawyer acting for Sarbajit proved in different courts that his client was not the accused person.”

As per Pakistan’s constitution’s Article 13-
Protection against double punishment and self incrimination

No person
(a) shall be prosecuted or punished for the same offence more than once; or
(b) shall, when accused of an offence, be compelled to be a witness against himself

So, if a person has served a term of 14 years he cannot be hanged or punished further since that would amount to dual punishment. However, in this case Sarabjit has already served 14 years. In fact he has been incarcerated for 22 years. Clearly there has been a huge travesty of justice, which the world must take note of and act upon strongly.

The way of treatment meted out to prisoners on both sides, has been dismal. Both the countries may count innumerable cases of their positive actions, but the truth is that the sate of such prisoners is dithering. Let us not forget that we are humans first, and enemies later. 

Without digressing from the topic, we must remember that it is us and only we people who can banish the hatred. On a number of sites like Youtube.com, Facebook.com, etc. the people of India and Pakistan keep commenting against each other on petty things mocking each other. When will all this end? Well, the perquisition for search its answer is on. Decision is yours!

The curious case of Katju!

Accept it or not. Like it or dislike it. Justice Markandey Katju will end his term as the most controversial and outspoken Press Council of India Chairman. His single comment on an issue gives a lot of food for thought and airtime to television news channels who inadvertently say, “Today India is hearing. The people of India needs an answer!” Sigh! Even Ekta Kapoor’s serials were less dramatic!

Sometimes, I wonder that is every and any kind of publicity really the best publicity? Well, the likes of Rakhi Sawant, Sherlyn Chopra, Poonam Pandey might now see a lot of people joining their bandwagon driving the media persons around them. Latest yet unnoticed entry is Mr. Katju. First of all, I respect Mr. Katju a lot. He has shown the guts to come and speak in public sphere time and again against ill-practices in states against media and the wrongdoings by media itself.

ImagePic: Retired Supreme Court of India Justice Markandey Katju

But, some of his statements have been perplexing. The latest jaw-dropping statement made by the Retired Supreme Court Judge is that, “Pakistan is a fake country, and one day it will reunite with India along with Bangladesh.” At a time when both the neighbor countries are disturbed internally and India’s foreign policy has taken a beating, such statements won’t amuse many.

He may confuse you with his words many a times. When he sees that he is in danger then he says that he has made that particular statement as a citizen of India, and when he sees that he has to take decision, he asserts his authority as a retired judge. Swapping roles fast, eh?  

He further goes on to say, “A fake country was created in the name of Pakistan. It is an artificially created entity by the British to make Hindus and Muslims keep fighting with each other, to stop India from becoming a powerful industrialized nation,” he said, answering questions after a symposium on ‘Reporting Terror: How Sensitive is the media?’ on 07 April 2013.

I am not against his statement but I do not like the timing as well as the free publicity element behind it. Without digressing from the subject, I would say that unless the politicians stop mixing their profession with religion and avoid from calling for caste based voting, there shall not be any solution or occurrence of merger between countries.

Once he said, “Ninety per cent of Indians are idiots. You people don’t have brains in your heads.” Subsequently, a PIL was filed against him and he eventually said sorry.

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If that wasn’t enough, read his one more remarkable statement! On September 3, Justice Katju had written an article in The Hindu, in which he, inter alia, went on to say:

“The level of intellect of many teachers is low, because many of them have not been appointed on merit but on extraneous considerations. To give an example, when I was a judge of Allahabad High Court I had a case relating to a service matter of a mathematics lecturer in a university in Uttar Pradesh.

Since the teacher was present in court I asked him how much one divided by zero is equal to.

He replied, Infinity.

I told him that his answer was incorrect, and it was evident that he was not even fit to be a teacher in an intermediate college. I wondered how had he become a university lecturer.”

Justice Katju claims that anything divided by zero is indeterminate. He is wrong and the lecturer was right because any non-zero number divided by zero is infinity. It is zero divided by zero that is indeterminate.

While one can understand the plight of the poor lecturer who did not have the courage to correct the judge hearing his case, I am appalled at the timidity of “some of the top senior academicians” of Jawaharlal Nehru University, to whom Justice Katju narrated the incident.

Well there a many startling statement made by him, but they cannot be put in here.By the way another one was, when he said that, “Sanjay Dutt should be pardoned because he was part of Munnabhai film, spreading Mahatma Gandhi’s ideologies…” And the list goes on.

Mush’s mush for Pak

Such is the love for the corridors of power, the sentiments for native place or call it a well thought of plan for hegemony, former Pakistan president, Pervez Musharraf has returned to Pakistan after spending 4 years in exile in Dubai. Seeking a possible political comeback in defiance of judicial probes and death threats from Taliban militants, Musharraf has made a big decision.

As intrepid and gutty he may sound, he says- “I don’t get scared by anyone except Allah, the Almighty. I have come back by putting my life in danger.”

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Pic: Pervez Musharraf at the Karachi Airport  

The journey from Dubai to the southern port city of Karachi was intended as the first step in his goal of rebuilding his image after years on the political margins. But the former military strongman was met by no more than a two thousand people at the airport, who threw rose petals and waved flags emblazoned with his image.

Since, the former general stepped down in the face of mounting discontent, Pakistan’s civilian leadership has struggled with a sinking economy, resilient Islamic extremist factions and tensions with Washington over drone strikes and the May 2011 raid that killed Osama Bin Laden.

His arrival could further complicate Pakistan’s attempt to hold parliamentary elections in May and stage its first transition from one civilian government to another.

He is viewed as an enemy by many Islamic militants and others for his decision to side with America in the response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. On 23rd March, the Pakistani Taliban vowed to mobilize death squads to send Musharraf “to hell” if he returns.

ImagePic: Pakistani Taliban members who have threatened him openly

Musharraf has a number of charges, including some originating from the probe of the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who also spent time in self-imposed exile in Dubai before returning.

So will he too face the doomsday, following the route of Bhutto?

The flight from Dubai came after several failed promises to return in recent years. Musharraf announced in early March that he would lead his party, the All Pakistan Muslim League, in May elections.

Let’s hope for the best for the country’s future. May the almighty bless them with a promising and peaceful future, which is in the thick of tensions at present.